Advanced search

Message boards : Graphics cards (GPUs) : How often should I replace my GPU thermal paste?

Author Message
Profile Logan Carr
Send message
Joined: 12 Aug 15
Posts: 207
Credit: 31,560,850
RAC: 91,597
Level
Val
Scientific publications
wat
Message 47974 - Posted: 15 Oct 2017 | 4:14:12 UTC

Hi all,

I just replaced my gpu's thermal paste. The old was dried out and I noticed while crunching that my temps are lower by a few degrees which is good to me. Before it was 73c and now it's 70c under windows XP using 98% of the GPU. And my power usage is higher which is good (before 103 and now 108) not sure if that has to do with me changing the paste though.

My question is if I use this gpu constantly every day, how often do you recommend I change the thermal paste? Perhaps take a guess if you don't know? Now I am aware that they don't need changing unless they get close to their max temp, but I'm really trying to get the most life out of mine as possible.

Thank you!
____________
Cruncher/Learner in progress.

Profile Retvari Zoltan
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 20 Jan 09
Posts: 1844
Credit: 10,679,584,594
RAC: 9,991,696
Level
Trp
Scientific publications
watwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwat
Message 47976 - Posted: 15 Oct 2017 | 8:37:52 UTC - in response to Message 47974.
Last modified: 15 Oct 2017 | 8:38:56 UTC

if I use this gpu constantly every day, how often do you recommend I change the thermal paste?
I recommend doing it every spring (before the hottest time in the year).

Now I am aware that they don't need changing unless they get close to their max temp
This is the other aspect: if the GPU temps are high (or higher than usual) it's needed to dust off the fins, and perhaps change the thermal paste.

It's like changing the oil in the engine of your car: it should be done after every 15.000km (~10.000 miles), or every year; whichever comes first.

but I'm really trying to get the most life out of mine as possible.
While lower temps are good for longevity, every such operation (disassembling the PC and the card itself) has a risk of causing a fatal failure by physical harm (kicking of an SMD component, dropping the cooler assembly on the card, bending the PCB, etc) or electrical harm (static discharge).

Profile Logan Carr
Send message
Joined: 12 Aug 15
Posts: 207
Credit: 31,560,850
RAC: 91,597
Level
Val
Scientific publications
wat
Message 47978 - Posted: 15 Oct 2017 | 13:22:10 UTC - in response to Message 47976.

thank you
____________
Cruncher/Learner in progress.

JoergF
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 20 Apr 15
Posts: 207
Credit: 304,023,061
RAC: 1,228,868
Level
Asp
Scientific publications
watwat
Message 47979 - Posted: 15 Oct 2017 | 15:27:40 UTC

While lower temps are good for longevity, every such operation (disassembling the PC and the card itself) has a risk of causing a fatal failure by physical harm (kicking of an SMD component, dropping the cooler assembly on the card, bending the PCB, etc) or electrical harm (static discharge).


In my opinion that risk outweighs the gain of a few degrees centigrade. Normally the GPU temps don't increase so quickly over time and changing the thermal paste will void the warranty anyway. So the first time you could try is 3 years after manufacturing date.

Frankly I would put my mind to keeping temperatures low <70°C by using Afterburner, setting a temperature limit. If the thermal paste is OK and the card well designed, it will manage the 70°C easily with a little clock and power limit reduction. However, if you see heavy load and power oscillations, it's probably time to change the paste.

Having said this, new thermal paste will not always lead to improvements, because the heat pipes ageing as well. Just to keep in mind. If the GPU shows 85°C before the overhaul and 84°C after, there apparently is something else cooking.

____________
I would love to see HCF1 protein folding and interaction simulations to help my little boy... someday.

Profile Logan Carr
Send message
Joined: 12 Aug 15
Posts: 207
Credit: 31,560,850
RAC: 91,597
Level
Val
Scientific publications
wat
Message 47981 - Posted: 15 Oct 2017 | 19:38:38 UTC - in response to Message 47979.

While lower temps are good for longevity, every such operation (disassembling the PC and the card itself) has a risk of causing a fatal failure by physical harm (kicking of an SMD component, dropping the cooler assembly on the card, bending the PCB, etc) or electrical harm (static discharge).


In my opinion that risk outweighs the gain of a few degrees centigrade. Normally the GPU temps don't increase so quickly over time and changing the thermal paste will void the warranty anyway. So the first time you could try is 3 years after manufacturing date.

Frankly I would put my mind to keeping temperatures low <70°C by using Afterburner, setting a temperature limit. If the thermal paste is OK and the card well designed, it will manage the 70°C easily with a little clock and power limit reduction. However, if you see heavy load and power oscillations, it's probably time to change the paste.

Having said this, new thermal paste will not always lead to improvements, because the heat pipes ageing as well. Just to keep in mind. If the GPU shows 85°C before the overhaul and 84°C after, there apparently is something else cooking.


Hi,

So right now it's getting to a max of 72c with auto fan speed. My power limit is set to the max of 122 and the card is using 107% to 108%. I assume the higher power usage is better for the project to run faster? Though not the electric bill.

Do you think I should crank the fan up to the max? Or lower the power limit?

What would I need to do to ensure that the card is efficient for the project is what I mean

Thanks
____________
Cruncher/Learner in progress.

PappaLitto
Send message
Joined: 21 Mar 16
Posts: 271
Credit: 1,331,910,331
RAC: 5,248,050
Level
Met
Scientific publications
watwat
Message 47982 - Posted: 16 Oct 2017 | 1:01:19 UTC - in response to Message 47981.

Hi,

So right now it's getting to a max of 72c with auto fan speed. My power limit is set to the max of 122 and the card is using 107% to 108%. I assume the higher power usage is better for the project to run faster? Though not the electric bill.

Do you think I should crank the fan up to the max? Or lower the power limit?

What would I need to do to ensure that the card is efficient for the project is what I mean

Thanks

What card do you have? I would keep your power limit high but raise your fans a bit. I try to keep my cards under 70C for longevity and to never let them heat up/cool down too fast. I can do this by turning off the card's fans below 53C in the fan curve settings in msi afterburner. This is to ensure that the solder points of the gpu don't crack over time and destroy the card.

I would not max out your fans as this will wear out your fans faster and be obnoxiously loud. Find a balance of temps and fan speed as well as try that fan curve setting I was speaking of.

Betting Slip
Send message
Joined: 5 Jan 09
Posts: 589
Credit: 2,044,516,875
RAC: 1,490,618
Level
Phe
Scientific publications
watwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwat
Message 47983 - Posted: 16 Oct 2017 | 2:34:38 UTC - in response to Message 47981.

At 72c your temp is fine, no need to do anything.

Profile Logan Carr
Send message
Joined: 12 Aug 15
Posts: 207
Credit: 31,560,850
RAC: 91,597
Level
Val
Scientific publications
wat
Message 47984 - Posted: 16 Oct 2017 | 4:34:09 UTC - in response to Message 47983.

My card is a gtx 670 blower style card, so I am not sure if configuring the fan in msi afterburner will work the same way. I put under 53c for it to be 0, but the fan still spins when it reaches below 53c, just at the lowest it can go I assume.
____________
Cruncher/Learner in progress.

Erich56
Send message
Joined: 1 Jan 15
Posts: 372
Credit: 1,685,138,202
RAC: 2,964,912
Level
His
Scientific publications
watwatwat
Message 47985 - Posted: 16 Oct 2017 | 5:43:58 UTC - in response to Message 47984.

... I put under 53c for it to be 0, but the fan still spins when it reaches below 53c, just at the lowest it can go I assume.

As it seems, many cards do not reduce the fan all way down to 0, but keep running at a certain low level, even without any GPU load.

So, both of my GTX750ti run at minimum 30% fan speed, this value cannot be lowered by any tool.

mindcrime
Send message
Joined: 27 Feb 14
Posts: 4
Credit: 120,251,862
RAC: 68,431
Level
Cys
Scientific publications
watwat
Message 47999 - Posted: 17 Oct 2017 | 23:56:41 UTC - in response to Message 47979.
Last modified: 17 Oct 2017 | 23:59:44 UTC

I agree mostly. The risk can often outweigh the reward, so do it after you've tried everything else. While not a GPU, I just recently removed and remounted an Antec Kuhler. My CPU temps dropped dramatically. I guess the person I bought the machine from had used the stock paste that came pre-applied. It was a very thick square pad and a novice could see it was way too much.

If you have clean and smooth surfaces less thermal paste will often yield better thermal performance.

The more thermal paste you have between the mounting surfaces the more air is exposed to it and will slowly oxidize and "dry-out" the paste. Those thick pads that come pre-applied from corsair, etc are just there so idiots don't put it on dry. If you aren't an idiot remove it and apply your own small grain of rice/pea-sized amount of paste.

http://cdn.overclock.net/e/e5/500x1000px-LL-e5598e8c_imageview.php.gif
Note that mayonnaise is better than a lot of the products on the market, do your research.

Post to thread

Message boards : Graphics cards (GPUs) : How often should I replace my GPU thermal paste?